Know Your Risk

Breast Cancer

Recognizing a growing need for effective, repeatable, non-invasive tests to

How common is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the 2nd most common cancer among American women3; the most common is skin cancer. About 1 in 84 women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime.

 

 

 

The number of breast cancer deaths has been declining since about 1989.  These decreases are believed to be the result of earlier detection through screening, increased awareness of breast cancer risks, as well as improved treatment.5

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts in the cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that can grow into surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. The disease mostly occurs in women, but men can get it too.  

 > Learn more about different types of breast cancer.

 > Are my breasts normal?

 

 

 

 

What DO women know about breast density?

Tell your story.  Join the Breast Cancer Mosaic.

Tell this to every woman you love. Email about this site.


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Risk Factors

Breast Cancer Risk Factors

The causes of breast cancer are not fully known, but many factors that contribute to increased or decreased chances of getting breast cancer are known. These are called risk factors.

Some risk factors cannot be changed such as: age, ethnicity, genetics or family history.  Other risk factors that can be changed include personal behaviors, such as exercise, drinking, and diet.  

>> Take a quiz at the National Cancer Institute website to learn more about your breast cancer risk factors.  (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

>> Learn more at the CDC website about risk factors that increase and decrease your breast cancer risk.   (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

>> Download an infographic about the connection between healthy habits and breast health. 

Having risk factors does not mean you will get breast cancer. Controlling your personal behavior risk factors may help reduce your risk. There are also many myths about breast cancer risks. Your doctor can help you understand your breast cancer risk factors and determine a screening plan based on your risk factors.  Quiz yourself on breast cancer myths and facts.

Can you lower your risk?

You can take steps that may help lower your risk and steps which may improve your chances that if a breast cancer does occur, it will be found at an early, more treatable stage. 

>> Learn about ways to stay healthy at the American Cancer Society website.  (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

>> Are you overweight? – calculate your BMI (body mass index) at the American Cancer Society website.  (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

Lifestyle changes

Making healthy lifestyle choices are important to help reduce your risk of cancer.  According to the American Cancer Society’s website - Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines, the most important risk factors that can be changed to help lower your risk of breast cancer are listed below. (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website):   

  • Be physically active
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Limit alcohol
  • Eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruit, poultry, fish, and low-fat dairy products.

>> Take a nutrition and activity quiz at the American Cancer Society website. (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

Cancer detection guidelines

The American Cancer Society website has guidelines for early detection.  Early detection will not prevent breast cancer, but it may help find it early when the likelihood of successful treatment is greatest.

What other good habits can help lower risk?  Learn more at the American Cancer Society website. Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.

Tell this to every woman you love. Email about this site.


Spread the word and share this site! Click on the    icon in the purple bar at the top of the page.

Understanding Breast Density

What is breast density?

Each woman’s breasts are different and have varying amounts of fat and breast tissue.  Breast density is measured as the total percentage of tissue in the breast:

  • High breast density means there is more breast tissue compared to fat
  • Low breast density means there is a more fat compared to breast tissue

Having high breast density (greater than 50%) is normal.  Breast density affects what your breasts look like on a mammogram. Dense tissue has the potential to hide cancer on a mammogram and having dense breasts alone may increase a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer by 4-6 times as compared to women with fatty tissue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You should ask your doctor about your breast density.  Your doctor can determine your breast density from your mammogram.  If you have dense breasts, ask your doctor how this may impact your personal risk of developing breast cancer and if additional testing would be right for you.  

Learn more about breast density: 

>> Download a breast density fact sheet.
>> Download an ABUS exam pamphlet.
>> Watch a Lifetime Television The Balancing ACT Segment – Different Tests for Different Breasts. (Please note: by clicking this link you are leaving this GE Healthcare website.)

View an ABUS Exam Demonstration:

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ABUS for dense breast screening is proven to increase cancer detection and reduce missed breast cancers from mammograms in women with dense breasts.21

89% of those women that have dense breasts don’t know their breast density.17

Do you know if you have dense breast tissue?


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References

3. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/detailedguide/breast-cancer-key-statistics.
4. American Cancer Society, Surveillance and Health Services Research, 2013, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/detailedguide/breast-cancer-key-statistics
5. Berry DA, Cronin KA, Plevritis SK, et al. Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. N Engl J Med. Oct 27 2005;353(17):1784-92.
15. Diagnosis Anxiety Working Mother Breast Screening Report: Working Mother Research Institute. September 2014.
17. GE Healthcare Breast Cancer Infographics, General Electric Company. Cancer Research UK: Breast Cancer Risk Factors. 2014.
18. Breast Cancer Awareness Infographic, General Electric Company, various sources.
20. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/detailedguide/breast-cancer-key-statistics.
21. PMA P110006.

Downloads

Infographic: Breast Cancer Healthy Habits

PDF 250KB
  • Date Created: 9/18/2014
  • Document ID: DOC1605559

Infographic: Breast Cancer Risk Awareness

PDF 3MB
  • Date Created: 9/30/2014
  • Document ID: JB24474US

Understanding Breast Self-Examination

PDF 76KB
  • Date Created: 9/19/2014
  • Document ID: DOC1024604

Find a Facility

Early detection of breast cancer enables treatment to be started earlier in the course of the disease, possibly before it has spread.

Advocate for your health and learn more about ABUS.

Use the GE Healthcare ABUS Locator application to find a facility in your area.

*Locations listed have opted in